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FROM VINE TO WINE

RESPECT FOR THE VINEYARDS AND FOR THE LAND FOSTERS THE RICHNESS OF THE WINES OF BURGUNDY

« A noble man never hates good wines »
[François Rabelais]

The vine is a perennial whose potential for production and longevity is directly related to the practices used in its cultivation.

The attention lavished season after season on the vineyard is the best guarantee of continuity for the wine-growing heritage and for the quality of the grapes yet to be harvested.

It also allows the vine to give the best of itself by drawing from the earth the elements it needs to give its fruit all the complex nuances of the land that is the greatness and richness of the great wines of Burgundy.

It is in this spirit that the vineyards of the area are worked: harvesting healthy and mature grapes which allow wine-making in « traditionnelle »fashion to be performed without complex oenological processes and without adding exogenous inputs which « tamper with the wine ».
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VINEYARD WORK

MAINTAIN THE NATURAL BALANCE AND ENCOURAGE BIODIVERSITY.

Aware that there is no good wine without good grapes and no good grapes without good vines, our wine production work is respectful of the environment.

Aware that there is no good wine without good grapes and no good grapes without good vines, our wine production work is respectful of the environment.

There is a dual purpose to this: to preserve as much as possible the natural balance of the vine-stocks and to promote the biodiversity of the environment.
- On the hillside plots, natural grass cover limits erosion.
- At the bottom of the hill, simple ploughing.
- Under the row, competing vegetation is controlled by the passage of a blade between the vine plants.
- Treatments are carefully reasoned. They are based on observing the vines, the weather conditions and forecasts, as well as on the predator attack risk bulletins issued by the chamber of agriculture of the Côte d'Or.

In parallel, careful trellising avoids clumps of vegetation while favouring photosynthesis, which ensures the grapes ripen properly.

Lastly, we practice leaf-thinning on the side facing the rising sun to promote ventilation around the clusters and thus limit the development of outbreaks of botrytis (grey rot).
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HARVESTING AND WINE-MAKING

RESPECT FOR THE GRAPE AND THE LAND FORMS THE BASIS OF THE DOMAINE'S PHILOSOPHY

Harvested by hand, minimal intervention in wine-making: respect for the land

THE GRAPE HARVEST

To harvest at maturity, samples of grapes are taken at regular intervals during the ten days before the harvest. The bunches are harvested by hand and sorted in the rows by the cutters. In this way, leaves, verjuice , green or scalded , bays and rot are eliminated at source. The grapes are then transported to the winery by regular rotations in small harvest crates. The objective is to avoid compaction of the clusters so as to prevent maceration and premature oxidation of the harvest, especially for Chardonnay (white wine).

WINE-MAKING

Our wine-making philosophy is one of minimal intervention, to better respect the land. In particular, the alcoholic fermentation is carried out with the indigenous yeasts, that is to say those that are naturally present on the harvested grapes.
White grapes : Once arrived at the winery, the Chardonnay grapes are gently pressed in order to extract the juice, which is placed in stainless steel tanks for 24 hours forclarification. This juice is then taken down to the cellar in oak barrels, where its alcoholic fermentation will occur over several weeks.
Red grapes: The red grapes are 100% de-stemmed before being placed in open oak vats, whey they are macerated for a few days at 15°/ 17°C. Alcoholic fermentation of the grape must starts naturally and the fermentation takes approximately 15 days. During this period, cap-punching and recoopering are carried out daily in order to extract the maximum amount of coloured and aromatic compounds. Once the alcoholic fermentation is complete, the wine is drawn and the products of malolactic fermentation are pressed. After tasting, all or part of the press wine is assembled with the free-run wine for clarification over a few days. The wine is then barrelled in oak barrels for ageing.
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AGEING

SPECIFIC CHOICES TO FAVOUR OUR THE EXPRESSION OF OUR WINES

Convey the richness and the light of our powerful and complex land

Our wines are aged for 16 to 18 months in oak barrels, 20 to 60% of which are new, depending on the appellations and vintages. During this period, the barrels are topped up at regular intervals with wine of the same vintage to prevent oxidation (ullage).

After some ten months, after malolactic fermentation , the wine is drawn to remove the coarser lees. A second drawing is performed just before bottling.

All the barrels of a single appellation are then brought together in a stainless steel tank for 3 to 4 weeks. The wine is then bottled without filtration.
This choice means that the wine retains all its complexity and all its richness, which reflect its land of origin. In return, a slight deposit may appear in the bottles during ageing. This natural deposit has no impact on the wine's organoleptic qualities.

Depending on the vintage, the white wine may undergo fining .